Whaam!! bam, it’s Lichtenstein: A Retrospective at the Tate – and a 70s influence on Tom Ford and Topshop

Roy Lichtenstein 1923-1997 Whaam! 1963 Tate © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein/DACS 2012

Roy Lichtenstein 1923-1997; Whaam! 1963; Tate
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein/DACS 2012

The prolific American Pop artist will be showcased at Tate Modern until 27 May, which is a particular treat for Flashin’ on the 70s, as our book, 70s Style & Design, celebrated the huge influence that artists such as Lichtenstein had on the Pop movement of the 1970s. Here are a few of our favourite Pop-art-inspired 70s things, some of which appear in 70s Style & Design…

Nova magazine showcases the Mr Freedom look in 1970

Nova magazine showcases the Mr Freedom look in 1970

Jean Shrimpton models Mr Freedom's Minnie Mouse T-shirt in Nova magazine in 1970. Photograph: Hans Feurer

Jean Shrimpton models Mr Freedom’s Minnie Mouse T-shirt in Nova magazine in 1970. Photograph: Hans Feurer

As early as 1970, Mr Freedom was influencing the US fashion scene, as reported by San Francisco's street style magazine Rags. The illustration is by Albert Elia

As early as 1970, Mr Freedom was influencing the US fashion scene, as reported by San Francisco’s street style magazine Rags. The illustration is by Albert Elia

Designers Jim O'Connor and Pamla Motown in 1972

After leaving Mr Freedom in 1972, designers Jim O’Connor and Pamla Motown set up on their own, working for more mainstream labels such as Scott Lester, for whom they designed these ultra-pop jumpers. Photograph: Steve Hiett

Former Mr Freedom designers Pam and Jim's friend Stan in one of the couple's designs in the early 70s

Pam and Jim’s friend Stan reads Shazam! while sporting one of the couple’s early 70s designs. Photograph courtesy of Pamla Motown

A waitress at Mr Freedom's Mr Feed'em restaurant. Photograph: Elizabeth Whiting Associates

A waitress at Mr Freedom’s Mr Feed’em restaurant. This was the vision of the shop’s interior designer Jon Wealleans, who was fascinated by Pop Americana, Disneyland and Ettore Sottsass. Photograph: Elizabeth Whiting Associates

George Hardie's comic-book-inspired poster design for Mr Freedom's Mr Feed'em restaurant

George Hardie’s comic-book-inspired poster design for Mr Freedom’s Mr Feed’em restaurant

Steven Thomas’s design for Biba’s food halk. Photograph courtesy of Steven Thomas

Steven Thomas’s design for Biba’s food hall brings Pop art to the supermarket, the original inspiration for artists such as Andy Warhol, who is namechecked in this fun reference to his Campbell’s Soup series. Photograph courtesy of Steven Thomas

Archizoom Associati's Rosa d'Arabia dream bed, 1967

Archizoom Associati’s Rosa d’Arabia dream bed, 1967

1970s interior with Roy Lichtenstein painting, by David Hicks

Pop colours and patterns inform this bold and brilliant interior by David Hicks, a standout designer of the 70s, whose clients could afford real Lichtensteins. Photograph: the estate of David Hicks

A selection of Thea Cadabra's pop-inspired fantasy footwear from the late 70s.

A selection of Thea Cadabra’s pop-inspired fantasy footwear from the late 70s. Photograph courtesy of Thea Cadabra

Some of Fiorucci's Lichtenstein-inspired stickers, issued with Panini bubblegum in 1984

Some of ultra-pop 70s label Fiorucci’s Lichtenstein-inspired stickers, issued with Panini bubblegum in 1984

And fast-forwarding back to 2013, the Lichtenstein show couldn’t be more timely, as Pop art is proving a major inspiration in fashion land. It started with Phillip Lim and Markus Lupfer’s cartoon capers in their pre-fall 2013 shows; next, Tom Ford was in on the act with his a/w 2013 collection, featuring Lichtenstein-like explosions on luxe gowns, and Topshop‘s current Comic Girl collection is the ultimate in superheroine chic.

Roy Lichtenstein 1923-1997 Wall Explosion II 1965 Tate © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein/DACS 2012

Roy Lichtenstein 1923-1997; Wall Explosion II 1965; Tate
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein/DACS 2012

Tom Ford a/w 2013 at style.com

Tom Ford’s ‘hip explosion’, autumn/winter 2013, as seen at style.com

Tom Ford a/w 2013 at style.com

Tom Ford’s a/w frocks are a flash of pop genius. As seen at style.com

Pop art-inspired sweaters from Phillip Lim and Markus Lupfer's Pre-fall 2013 collections

Pop art-inspired sweaters from Phillip Lim and Markus Lupfer’s pre-fall 2013 collections

Topshop's Kaboom tube skirt

Topshop’s Kaboom tube skirt

Topshop's whaam, blam, whoosh! jumper

Topshop’s whaam, blam, whoosh! jumper

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